Mar 18

Becoming an Executive in the Nonprofit Sector

jgrahamJohn H. Graham IV served the American Diabetes Association for 24 years, the last thirteen as Chief Executive Officer. Today, John serves as the President and Chief Executive Officer of ASAE, the center for association leadership ( www.asaecenter.org )  ASAE includes more than 21,000 association executives and industry partners representing 10,000 organizations in the United States and around the world.

I asked John to provide his perspective on the association/nonprofit world for those considering a career transition into this sector.

VSB: John, what do you see as the key skill sets needed to be a successful association executive?

Graham: Association management is not rocket science.  To be proficient, it requires knowing a little bit about numerous areas including public affairs, communications, non-profit finance, sponsorships, meetings, tradeshows and technology.  However, the most important skill is a high EQ and being able to be a servant leader putting volunteer leaders first.

 Association management is not rocket science…the most important skill is a high EQ and being able to be a servant leader putting volunteer leaders first.

VSB: Those new to leadership in the nonprofit sector may not realize there are many different types of organizations. What are some of the important distinctions between leadership of a membership association versus leadership of a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization? Are there any similarities of note?

Graham: There are broadly three types of volunteer organizations:  charitable (American Red Cross), individual membership (American Bar Association) and trade associations (American Plastics Council).

  • Charitable organizations usually focus on a specific cause and tend to be dependent on, and engaged with, volunteers in addition to maintaining a paid staff. They typically rely on contributions from individuals, foundations and other grants for support.
  • Individual membership or professional societies focus on a given profession and rely on active volunteer leadership to ensure the organization is as effective as possible. Membership and event dues often provide the backbone of financial support.
  • Trade associations generally tend to focus on advocacy for an industry and require little volunteer engagement other than around governance. Financial support is provided by the companies that belong to the trade association.

Each of the three types have boards of directors and committees that focus in on specific areas of importance to the organization.

 

VSB: What additional guidance would you like to share with senior leaders retiring from military service who are thinking about a second career as an association executive or perhaps taking on a volunteer role as a nonprofit board member?

Graham: Serving on a non-profit board and being as staff member are two very different paths.  Becoming an association executive is a career choice that can be very rewarding but it is a definitive career path.  Board service is an avocation and, within the nonprofit sector, is typically an unpaid opportunity.

 

VSB: Does ASAE Center offer any resources that might be useful to military leaders exploring a transition into the nonprofit sector?

Graham: ASAE has a micro site called Career HQ which helps interested people navigate jobs in associations.  http://www.asaecenter.org/Career/careerhq.cfm

 

VSB: What about getting a Certified Association Executive credential?

Graham: Among association leaders, the CAE designation has become known and appreciated as a mark of distinction that offers a wide range of benefits.

Individuals pursue the CAE for a variety of reasons, including professional development, career planning and professional pride, dedication to their career, a personal belief in the association profession, and self-fulfillment.

At the same time, individuals cannot sit for the CAE exam until they have five or more years of experience as an executive working in an association.

Feb 18

Career Transition Insights to Jumpstart Your Search

Jim Carman I had the honor of meeting retired Navy Captain Jim Carman nearly three years ago, soon after he joined the team at the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), following his stint as a career and talent management consultant with Right Management.

Today, Jim is the Director of MOAA’s Transition Center, which provides career transition consulting, benefits and financial education, and veterans and survivor disability claim assistance to the military community. We have the good fortune to work with one another several times a year, team-teaching the organization’s Military Executives in Transition (MET) program.

I asked Jim to share some of the great counsel he continues to offer so many active duty military and vets in transition:

VSB: Jim, what do you see as the most common challenges senior military leaders must overcome as they compete for jobs in the civilian workforce?

Carman:

The job market remains very competitive. 2014 was the strongest year of hiring since 1999; at the same time, companies report an average of 383 applications for every open position. Landing a good job may take some time, so it is essential to start researching and networking well before your expected retirement date.

Given the realities of the marketplace, transitioning military leaders are well-advised to be realistic in the job hunt. Specifically:

  • Look for positions where your skills, experience and passion align with a reasonable economic motivator; don’t let the salary be the primary determinant in your job search.
  • Grow your network to help you explore a wide range of industries and sectors.
  • Be prepared to consider reasonable offers that may not be perfect in terms of pay or geographic location, but do provide a chance to learn about the world of business and acquire new skills.

 

VSB: Current wisdom suggests that military leaders should begin preparing for transition 12-24 months before separation from service.  What specific steps would you recommend for those still on active duty?

Carman:

  • Reconnect with alumni groups associated with where you earned your undergraduate and graduate degrees.
  • Join LinkedIn and create a thoughtful profile without the  military acronyms and with a photo in civilian business attire that highlights the skills you will bring to a prospective employer in the civilian workforce. Join LinkedIn groups that align with your post-military career interests.
  • Look for opportunities to attend conferences and make connections with thought leaders. It’s a little outside the comfort zone for many of us, but it can pay huge dividends through exposure to new ideas, new thinking and new possibilities.

 

VSB: How can transitioning senior military leaders more effectively negotiate their salary and benefit packages once offered a position in the civilian workforce?

Carman:  First, it’s important to know your own worth and equally important, the appropriate salary range for the positions you are considering in the industries of interest to you.  Don’t rely solely on the popular online salary sites since those numbers are based on self-reported data and everyone tends to exaggerate personal levels of compensation.  Instead, connect with individuals working at a similar or more senior level in the same industry and geographic area in question.  Once you nail down the accurate range, build a case as to why you should be placed in the top half of that range: education, experience, contacts, passion and energy can help justify bringing you on board near the top of the range for the position in question.  If you can’t get together on salary, consider asking for a six month performance review, presuming you are confident you will be able to have significant impact in that timeframe.

Second, try to delay the discussion about salary as long as possible.  Employers are increasingly following one of two practices: either they ask candidates for salary expectations right up front or they wait until the very end of the interview process. The latter approach will generally work in the candidate’s favor since, by that time, the candidate has presumably provided ample evidence of being the right choice to fill the job. Companies are typically impressed when a candidate never raises the compensation question or expectations. Be patient, it will come up in due course.

 

VSB: Many transitioning senior leaders leave behind their military careers in pursuit of a new job they expect to hold until they fully retire from the workforce. How does that mesh with current trends in the civilian workforce?

Carman: The reality is that most of us are going to have to leave our current civilian role in 5-6 years, if not sooner, in order to gain more responsibility, new challenges, increased compensation or a combination of all of these factors.  In addition, sometimes the first couple of jobs taken are not always the right fit, due to a mismatch of cultural expectations, poor communication or other factors. This is not uncommon, but it is important to learn from those mismatches to ensure a better fit the next time around.

After you land your first civilian role, take time to thank all of those people who helped you; let them know where you landed and stay in touch. Don’t assume that, once you have a job in hand, there is no need to remain active on LinkedIn. Make an effort to connect with one or two people each week; you never know who will open the door to your next opportunity.

 

VSB: What does MOAA do to help military leaders transition more successfully into the civilian workforce?

Carman: MOAA offers its Premium and Life Members every service and support needed to launch a successful campaign in an economy that still feels like a recession to many people. This includes:

  • Resume and LinkedIn profile development assistance
  • Interview preparation using an online video prep tool available to all of our members anywhere in the world
  • Negotiation support
  • Live and Virtual Career Fairs
  • Connections to other MOAA members working in similar industries
  • A LinkedIn career networking group. Search MOAA Career Networking under LinkedIn Groups in order to become a member.

For those who wish to go beyond ETAP for more intensive, customized career transition assistance, MOAA offers periodic, one-day, executive transition seminars in the metro DC area that also include several hours of follow-on, one-on-one career management consulting services. The cost of this one-day, executive-level seminar, follow-on consulting services and related benefits is less than the cost of one hour with most executive coaches; you can’t beat the great value of MOAA’s Military Executives in Transition (MET) program if you want to kick start your post-military job hunt into high gear. The next MET session takes place on April 2, 2015.

To learn more, visit: www.moaa.org/career

Jan 19

Gauge Your Openness to Change in Transition

It is fair to say that we are largely creatures of habit at work and at home. The creation of personal and professional daily routines gives us some feeling of control in the chaotic world in which we live.  That said, there comes a time in both our professional and personal lives when we are facing a change. It is not always easy to do.

Disabled American Veterans’ National Chaplain, Michael P. Dover recently shared some of the common reasons that people resist change.*  His thoughts were presented in the context of people quickly abandoning well-intentioned New Year’s resolutions, but I think several of his points are equally relevant for those finding themselves stymied in the process of a major professional transition:

  • People are unwilling to give up the safe, predictable and familiar.
  • We have no real conviction that change is better than the status quo.
  • We feel safer staying where we are, uncertain what life will be like if the change takes place.

No question that with change, comes risk.  We want to avoid failure, making mistakes, feeling embarrassed in front of colleagues or family members who know us as high-achieving, highly competent individuals.

Professional transition, whether by your own choice or someone else’s, mandates change in routine and a departure from established activities and behaviors. It may be challenging to shift gears in mid-life, but it can be done. As with the proverbial joke about the number of psychologists it takes to change a light bulb, the answer is “One, but it must be willing to change.”

It may be challenging to shift gears in mid-life, but it can be done. As with the proverbial joke about the number of psychologists it takes to change a light bulb, the answer is “One, but it must be willing to change.”

Keep Chaplain Dover’s suggestions in mind:

  • You have to be committed to change — in your heart and in your head.
  • Set attainable, specific goals for yourself, rather than flap around in the ambiguity of motivational slogans that “all things are possible” — you may, indeed, not be able to compete any longer as a U.S. Olympic javelin thrower.
  • Don’t isolate yourself. Talk with others throughout the transition process to learn from your peers’ experiences. Don’t think you have to do this in a vacuum.

Here are some basic ways to get started:

  • Replace that LinkedIn headshot of yourself in military uniform to a more recent one you have taken while wearing a well-fitting business suit.
  • Reevaluate your current resume and LinkedIn profile to see how you can reframe your military experience into terms that anyone could understand and appreciate.
  • Remove all the acronyms and highlight how the experience you’ve gained can make a quantifiable difference for a civilian employer who is comparing you to another veteran applying for the same job.

Let us know some of the ways you have brought about change in attitude, perspective or delivery as you navigated your transition from military service. Others are waiting to learn from your experience!

 

* “We must learn to change”, Michael P. Dover, National DAV Chaplain, DAV Magazine, January/February 2015

 

 

Jan 09

COAST GUARD RETIREES BECOME FEMA RESERVISTS

Skip BowenHanging up the uniform need not mean walking away from the opportunity to continue to serve others.  There are a number of efforts that have emerged in recent years as a way to enable veterans to continue to serve their communities and their country.

Recently, I learned about the U.S. Coast Guard Retiree to FEMA Reservist Initiative, spawned through conversations about how Coast Guard retirees can help meet the disaster response personnel needs of the Federal Emergency Management Agency.  I asked Charles “Skip” Bowen, former Master Chief Petty Officer of the U.S. Coast Guard, to share the background on this new program.

VSB: Tell us about this innovative initiative and how it came together.

Bowen: As a new co-chair of the Commandant of the Coast Guard National Retiree Council, I was looking for ways that Coast Guard retirees could “give back” by applying the experience they gained during their military service. Throughout my own Coast Guard career, I took pride knowing that I was part of a humanitarian service; search & rescue and emergency response are the missions that initially attracted me to the Coast Guard and are largely why I remained for so much of my career. I know that many Coast Guard retirees share my desire to continue to serve by applying our training and skills where they are most needed.

During my research, I learned that FEMA — one of our sister agencies within the Department of Homeland Security — is experiencing a personnel shortage in its Reserve program.  Over 2700 FEMA Reserve positions are vacant.

I know that many Coast Guard retirees share my desire to continue to serve by applying our training and skills where they are most needed.

After further exploration and many conversations with respected colleagues, it became clear that Coast Guard retirees’ experience in disaster response, rescue, hazardous material handling, survivor support and recovery operations could bring a reliable and dedicated source of support to help meet FEMA’s current response and recovery needs.

Our dialogue led to the creation of the U.S. Coast Guard Retiree to FEMA Reservist Initiative.

This effort is intended to increase “the depth, reliability and skill set of FEMA’s incident workforce … (by enhancing) its corps of intermittent employees who serve on the ground during disasters…” 

The Initiative provides an opportunity for Coast Guard retirees to support one of several Incident Workforce Cadres. These include, but are not limited to, roles in acquisitions, disaster emergency communications, disaster field training operations, hazard mitigation, logistics, safety and security.

 

VSB: Are there any prerequisites to be eligible to participate? Is there specific training that will be required?

Bowen:  While there is no age restriction, FEMA’s Conditions of Employment includes the following stipulation: I understand the Agency may ascertain the fitness of applicants as to health, character, knowledge and ability before appointing them to the Reservist Program.

Once a Coast Guard retiree is accepted, he or she will participate in an in-house FEMA training program. FEMA Reservists are trained and qualified to perform a myriad of tasks during a disaster response.  When they are deployed, Reservists will be reimbursed for travel and paid as intermittent FEMA employees.

 

VSB: How can veterans from the other Armed Forces lend their support to this new program?

Bowen:  Reaching out to Coast Guard retirees will serve as Phase I and “proof of concept” for a larger initiative targeting all military veterans. During the second phase, our Council will work with FEMA to reach out to retirees from the other Armed Forces.  Phase 3 will entail a targeted effort toward all military veterans in general and to wounded warriors in particular.

 

VSB: Where can our readers learn more about this opportunity?

Bowen: Interested Coast Guard retirees can learn more about how they can help fill a critical need in FEMA’s disaster response and recovery capabilities by visiting:

https://www.fema.gov/information-employees/us-coast-guard-retiree-fema-reservist-initiative

 

Nov 11

Honoring Veterans 365 Days a Year

Though it has become commonplace for civilians to thank military members in uniform for their service, a deeper acknowledgement and appreciation of veterans’ sacrifices and experiences occur with far less frequency.

At a certain level, it is difficult for those who have not served in one of the five Armed Forces to truly understand the life or death decisions that have to be made in an eye-blink, often with irreversible consequences. Or to appreciate the difficult responsibility of letting parents know their young soldier is not coming home again. Or to know what it means to train for months and years to become part of a team of people who will put their own lives on the line to keep each other out of harm’s way and achieve the intended mission.

At a certain level, it is difficult for those who have not served in one of the five Armed Forces to truly understand the life or death decisions that have to be made in an eye-blink, often with irreversible consequences.

Is it any wonder that, upon separation from military service, many veterans feel as though they have been left alone on an island, uncertain about their own next steps? It takes more than the offer of a job or a “thank you” on Veteran’s Day to truly honor service members no longer wearing the uniform.

It takes more than the offer of a job or a “thank you” on Veteran’s Day to truly honor service members no longer wearing the uniform.

Here is how you can make a difference in the life of a transitioning veteran:

 

  1. Become a mentor. Listen to concerns, be a sounding board, provide guidance and remain a solid presence in the veteran’s life; don’t abandon ship once the vet has landed a job.
  2. As an employer, once you hire a veteran, make sure your on-boarding program goes beyond the typical administrative focus on leave policies. Give the individual time to meet co-workers, ask questions, learn the overall agency/corporate mission and understand the new culture.
  3. The sooner you can engage the veteran as a contributing member of a productive team, the smoother the workplace transition will be, regardless of rate or rank.
  4. Find ways to engage veterans in the community. Nonprofit organizations will find that veterans, on the whole, have much to contribute as board members, hands-on volunteers and in other capacities. Take the time to connect with veterans and let them know their time, expertise and engagement is truly welcome.
  5. Remind the veterans you know that you “have their six.” Whether you are a family member, friend, relative or neighbor, let transitioning veterans know you are ready to look out for them and their families in whatever way you are able.

Let’s show our veterans that honoring their service to country is what we do 365 days a year; let them know they are not alone in their journey back to civilian life.

Sep 23

Tough Love from a Retired Navy Vet

SultanRecently, I came across some “tough love” advice from career transition and LinkedIn expert, Sultan Camp, who writes a monthly blog and shares his perspective as a recruiter on Twitter and through other social media. I asked Sultan to share some of his thoughts with our readers:

VSB: Many senior military leaders struggle with how to begin developing a civilian job search strategy while, at the same time, still giving their all to the military service that has been their professional and personal home for so many years. What advice would you give to help these leaders avoid waiting until days before retirement to start working on what comes next? 

Camp: Let’s imagine that you’ve been given an OPORDER to deploy to a hostile environment. Would you wait until you’ve set the navigation detail or started your deployment to begin developing your OPLAN training, assessment, evaluation, and tracking the metrics on your PO&AM? Of course not, yet that’s what a lot of senior military professionals do every single day when it comes to their own transitions.

When you receive your OPORDER to separate from Active Duty, it will be one of your most challenging assignments: deployment to a “place” you have never been before. Preparing two years in advance is generally agreed upon as being optimum. That way you can gather intelligence, practice training scenarios, get evaluated, review lessons learned, receive feedback and track your progress.

We are in an era where the Federal Government is shedding jobs at a historic rate; competition for Federal jobs is literally pitting Veterans against civilians. Terms such as “Lowest Price Technically Acceptable” and “sequestration” are common place in today’s world of shrinking defense budgets and reduced contracts.

 

VSB:  You’ve been quoted as saying that a senior military leader’s resume should not be a history paper, filled with details designed to showcase an illustrious military career? What strategies would recommend instead?

Camp:

1. Find one of your peers who has recently transitioned and gotten hired. Ask to see his or her resume that was used to get the job. You may find that there are components of it that would be relevant to you as well, but at the same time, it will be important to make it contextual and unique to reflect who you are and the talents you bring to a prospective employer.

2. You may also want to ask your colleague HOW he or she got the job. I’m pretty sure that you’ll quickly discover something that you already know. In both the public and private sectors, it’s NETWORKING that will get you those opportunities.

3. Don’t wait until you have 90 days left to start “testing” your resume; this puts you at a huge disadvantage. Even though hiring managers won’t seriously want to hear from you until you are 90 days out, start applying for positions about 6-8 months away from your availability date to “test the waters” so that you can see if you get any callbacks requesting interviews. If you’re not getting calls or are only getting calls for sales positions, that’s a true indication that your resume is failing you. Better to find that out sooner rather than later.

 Don’t wait until you have 90 days left to start “testing” your resume; this puts you at a huge disadvantage.

VSB: What are some of the best ways senior leaders in transition can market themselves to stand out from their military and civilian competition?

 Camp: Each day, 600-800 service members are  transitioning off of active duty, which means that at least 150-200 officers leave the service every day. Translation: You are going to have to stand out from both your military and civilian competition.

One way to do that is to leave your rank at home and push yourself to get out and meet people. I know that this can be difficult. You worked hard to reach this point in your military career, but trust me when I tell you that those of us on this side of the uniform can tell when someone is wearing their rank even if they are wearing a business suit and it does not leave a good impression. As you network, in person and online, make it a point to listen more than you speak; learn more about the people that you meet and discover ways to help them. One of the best ways to do this is to ask “What are the biggest challenges that you are addressing in your current role?” Offer to help and then do what you say that you’re going to do.

Develop a reputation as a linchpin or connector outside of the military.

In addition, make the effort to join and participate in at least two professional organizations. For example, you may want to consider joining one with a military affiliation, such as the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) and then join another one that reflects your intended industry. Ideally you should try to do this 24 months in advance of your transition. One or two evenings invested each month will yield more return in terms of gaining industry insight and, more importantly, building your reputation and network outside the military. Also, consider LinkedIn Groups as a virtual way of doing this, but, don’t let it be a substitute for in-person networking.

On a final note, get past your reservations, learn as much as you can and embrace the use of all of the Social Networking Sites as a Professional (yes, that includes Facebook and Twitter).

 You worked hard to reach this point in your military career, but trust me when I tell you that those of us on this side of the uniform can tell when someone is wearing their rank even if they are wearing a business suit

VSB: Any other advice you’d like to offer?

Camp: Realize the importance that geographic flexibility plays in terms of income, types of jobs and employability. I know that the temptation is to “buy the house and settle down once and for all.” However, when location becomes your top priority, it means that salary and the type of job take a number two and three ranking. I understand that this may be unavoidable because of family considerations, but any recruiter can tell you that the more flexible you are in your transition, the more opportunities you can create and that may be opened up to you.

Secondly, as you build your network, find ways of keeping in touch. Social networking helps in this endeavor. You can periodically post relevant articles, maybe even create a blog that would be of interest to those in your online networks.

Create a 360 degree professional network by going to LinkedIn and searching for those old Commands or units that you were attached to using the search bar. Then take a look at the profiles that show up in the search results. Chances are, that young O-3 or E-5 who separated four, six or 10 years ago may now be in a position to link you to a great civilian career opportunity.

Finally, get out there and start building your business wardrobe and start wearing it as you network (hint: ditch the uniform). You’ll be amazed how much this simple act will help you in your mental preparation to hang up the uniform and make you more approachable by civilians.

Sultan Camp is a 20-year Navy veteran, a recruiter with Orion International and is based in Norfolk, VA. Feel free to contact him via LinkedIn or follow him on Twitter at @careersultan.. Sultan works with Navy candidates who are 4-18 months from transition who are planning their career search and preparing for their transition from Active Duty.

Aug 05

Differentiate Yourself from the Competition

We all know it is essential to stand out from the crowd in the competition for a great job. What are the specific steps you need to take to really make that happen?

megguiseppiI turned to Meg Guiseppi, an experienced c-suite, executive career guru whose advice has been featured and quoted in Forbes, Huffington Post, Wall Street Journal’s FINS, Inc.com, Fortune, CMO.com, PBS’ Next Avenue, and other locations.

VSB: Meg, why is it so vital for senior executives to use social media as part of their executive job search?

MG: First, and foremost, senior executives need to have an online presence because recruiters and hiring professionals are Googling “their name” to assess their viability as candidates. Those with a more far-reaching online footprint (that is, more relevant search results for their name) are viewed as more desirable than those with limited or non-existent online presence.

Networking is the best way to land a job. You need to identify the right people to network with – recruiters and employees at the companies you’re targeting – and “meet” them where they hang out. These days, most of them are active on social media – LinkedIn, Google+, Twitter, Facebook, etc. – so you need to be there, too.

Most hiring professionals go to LinkedIn first, to search for and assess candidates, based on relevant keywords. If you have no LinkedIn profile, or an anemic one with few of your particular relevant keywords, you’re probably invisible to them.

But also, these people are looking online for “social proof” backing up the claims you’ve made about yourself verbally and in your resume, if you’ve already reached out to them. So it’s important to build a diverse online presence to provide them with plenty of information about you. And, it’s important to regularly monitor your search results, so you can deal with digital dirt, if necessary.

(S)enior executives need to have an online presence because recruiters and hiring professionals are Googling “their name” to assess their viability as candidates.

VSB: What are some of the most effective strategies to build a personal brand to differentiate oneself in this competitive job market?

MG: Branding for job search is all about identifying and communicating the attributes, motivating strengths, values, areas of expertise, skill sets, and other qualifications you possess that the companies you’re targeting are looking for. Knowing this “insider” information helps you create brand-reinforcing content that generates chemistry for you and will resonate with your target employers.

This means that, before you can define and develop your personal brand, you need to identify a good list of companies or organizations (say, 15-20) that will be a good mutual fit, and then research each one to find out what makes you potentially valuable to them.

“Differentiation” is the key with branding. Too many job seekers create personal marketing content (resume, LinkedIn profile, etc.) that reads pretty much the same as their competitors’. Sameness won’t distinguish you and position you as the best hiring choice in today’s competitive job market. Differentiation is what makes you stand out over and above your competitors . . . and sells you to your target employers.

 “Differentiation” is the key with branding. Too many job seekers create personal marketing content (resume, LinkedIn profile, etc.) that reads pretty much the same as their competitors’.

VSB: What differentiates an Executive Resume from the resume of a mid-level manager?

MG: No matter what your professional level, your resume is a personal marketing document designed to help you land interviews. The content that needs to be in anyone’s resume is driven by what their target companies’ current needs are and how they’re uniquely qualified to help them meet those needs.

At the executive level, especially the very senior level (EVP, c-suite, President, etc.), qualifications that are important to include in the resume lean more towards leadership capability. For instance, motivating teams to excel and build revenue, managing global operations, and turning around failing businesses are typically the kinds of qualities companies seek in top-level executives. But they may also be important for lower level executives and managers.

 

VSB: What are some of the most common mistakes you’ve seen executives make throughout the job search process?

MG: The biggest one is trying to circumvent the targeting process and going straight to writing their resume without enough focus, which results in content that’s too generic and doesn’t hit home with anyone.

Another very common mistake is spending the majority of job search time on various job boards, responding to job postings. Considering that only about 5% of jobs are landed through job boards, doesn’t it make more sense to limit your time there, and spend most of your time on the method that yields something like an 80-90% success rate . . . that is, networking?

 

VSB:  How can senior leaders in transition accelerate their executive job search?

MG: My best advice is to spend some time learning about today’s job search . . . reputable resources abound online . . . and understand the linear path it takes, so you can avoid missteps.

Follow this checklist to get on board with best practices for today’s executive job search:

1. Get clear on what kind of job you want, who your target employers are, what their needs are right now, how you can help them, and who their key hiring decision makers are.

2. Define your executive brand and differentiate your unique value from your competition.

3. Get your resume, bio and other career marketing materials together as the foundation for your brand communications.

4. Move your brand communications online with LinkedIn and other social media, and start building a diverse, vibrant online presence.

5. Put your online and offline brand communications to work in all your networking efforts.

6. Work on circumventing the gatekeepers at your target companies and connecting directly with the key hiring decision makers and other employees, where they hang out online and offline.

7. Cultivate relationships with several executive recruiters who specialize in your niche.

8. Prepare to excel in job interviews.
——————————————————–

Meg Guiseppi is author of “23 Ways You Sabotage Your Executive Job Search and How Your Brand Will Help You Land” (http://executivecareerbrand.com/personal-branding-and-executive-job-search-books/executive-branding-job-search-ebook/). She has partnered with senior-level and c-suite executives for 20+ years to help them differentiate and strategically position their unique ROI for today’s executive job search, and Land a GREAT-FIT New Gig!™

You can connect with Meg at ExecutiveCareerBrand.com, on Google+ (https://plus.google.com/118226084984360329063/about) and Twitter (@MegGuiseppi).

Jul 08

Career Transition is Not One Size Fits All

Mike BruniI was delighted to meet Mike Bruni who joined us as a luncheon speaker at a recent Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) Military Executives in Transition Workshop.  Mike has more than 17 years of experience in human Resources, recruiting & staffing.  He joined SAIC (now Leidos) in 2005  and was instrumental in standing up a centralized SAIC/Leidos Military Recruiting Program, Operation MVP to recruit top talent from all branches of the Military.  Mike continues to lead the program to this day. 

VSB: Mike, as a Talent Acquisition Manager focused on recruiting top military talent for Leidos, what do you see as the most important things senior military leaders should highlight in their outreach to a prospective private sector employer of interest?

MB:  I’ve noticed that most veterans structure their resumes as generalists, combining all of their career experience. The best practice in the market today is to highlight specific skills, especially those that the person in transition wants to emphasize and that are more in line with the desired career track or occupation that one is pursuing. The more detailed and specific you can be in marketing yourself and in structuring your resume, the higher the likelihood of getting noticed and ultimately presented with an opportunity. Marketing as a generalist, particularly in the government contracting industry, tends not to get one much traction.

The more detailed and specific  you can be in marketing yourself and in structuring your resume, the higher the likelihood of getting noticed and ultimately presented with an opportunity.

VSB: What are some of the more common missteps you’ve seen transitioning military leaders make as they begin their pursuit of civilian job opportunities?

MB:  I don’t know that I would describe this as a misstep, but I believe one of the challenges that transitioning military leaders face is the ability to articulate and translate their expertise to potential employers. How certain experience and expertise translates can be confusing. The more research one can do on a particular industry or company, the better prepared one will be in pursuing that organization.

Career transition and job seeking is not a “One size fits all” approach. Preparation and the ability to market oneself to the intended audience is crucial. For instance, the marketing stance that you would take in pursuing a government contractor that provides services back to the Department of Defense would be very different from a marketing stance pursuing a large multi-national retail chain. The experiences and expertise translate differently to each intended target. Understanding your intended target audience and doing the research to tailor your marketing to that organization is the process to employ in order to overcome that challenge.

 (T)he marketing stance that you would take in pursuing a government contractor that provides services back to the Department of Defense would be very different from a marketing stance pursuing a large multi-national retail chain. The experiences and expertise translate differently to each intended target.

VSB:  What advice would you give to those trying to develop their personal brand to better stand out from their military and civilian competition?

MB:

  • Assess yourself to find out what you really want to do and what you don’t want to do.
  • Figure out in the marketplace who is looking for you and your expertise. Think about it this way: Who is most likely to find me valuable and an asset to their organization with my skillset?  Once you can answer that question, target and market to those organizations.
  • Organize your search and prepare yourself well before you approach a prospective employer.
  • Blanketing a particular market with your resume is counterproductive in many ways. The more thought-out, prepared approach has a higher likelihood of being recognized and standing out from the competition.
  • Organizations today are not only looking for qualified candidates, they are also looking for the “Best Fit”. They want employees who fit into the culture and can easily adapt to their environment. Do the research in advance to learn about a target organization’s culture, work environment, etc. 

VSB:  How much do you rely on LinkedIn as a means of identifying prospective candidates?  How would you advise transitioning senior military leaders to develop positive visibility on LinkedIn, Twitter and other social media sites?

MB: LinkedIn has over 300 million users. It is a very powerful and heavily used tool by prospective employers and recruiters; today almost 97% or recruiters state that they use LinkedIn for recruiting, so ensuring you have a solid LinkedIn profile is a no-brainer:

  • My advice to anyone in career transition is to set up a LinkedIn Profile. LinkedIn is a great platform to market your skills and expertise.
  • Market yourself with a professional picture.
  • Maximize the fields to showcase your experience and career highlights, and upload material that shows the audience who you are (PPTs, Tailored Resumes, Podcasts).
  • Use LinkedIn not only to broadcast your profile and as a means of advertising yourself, but also a proactive tool to seek out strategic contacts, researching organizations, and contributing; seek out companies, groups, recent and former contacts, fellow Service Members, and connect.  Build a robust network and get recognized.
  • The more you use LinkedIn, the more exposure you receive. Also, it is much more fun for a recruiter to use than an Applicant Tracking System so recruiters tend to spend more time on LinkedIn; it offers what a resume doesn’t. It brings to life your profile and resume.

 

(T)oday almost 97% or recruiters state that they use LinkedIn for recruiting, so ensuring you have a solid LinkedIn profile is a no-brainer.

VSB: Any other advice you’d like to share with our audience?

MB:

  • Give a lot of thought about what you would like to do. Think about whether you would like to pursue a second career, act as a consultant, etc. Once you assess that and figure out what is it you want to do, then focus on where you would like to do it.
  • Ask yourself these key questions: Which companies appeal to me? Which companies offer the type of opportunity that I want to take on?  Is this the type of company that will be a good fit for me?
  • Performing this self-assessment and preparing way in advance of submitting a resume or going into an interview will benefit you in both the short and long term. Understanding the landscape sets you up for long-term employment and growth.
  • Align the opportunity and organization that you pursue with your own personal goals.

 

#                                          #                                      #

Jun 20

” Leverage Your Military Leadership “

As a senior military executive, you have demonstrated your leadership skills as you have built teams, provided vision, and given the leaders of tomorrow the opportunity to learn and grow. Moving forward into your next career, how will you “leverage” your military leadership and highlight the specific skills you will bring to a private, public or nonprofit employer? 

bernadine_karunaratneRecently, I connected with Bernadine Karunaratne, President, U.S. Government Consulting Services, at Korn Ferry, where she leads the firm’s Leadership and Talent Consulting government team. She addressed several key points including employers’ desire to find candidates with the right personality fit, in addition to having the right skill set to do the job successfully.

VSB: What are some of the best ways for senior military leaders to highlight their strengths and talents with retained recruiters?

BK:

  • The first step is having the right mindset. As a transitioning military leader, you have world-class training that makes you a valuable asset to many types of civilian organizations. Take the time to analyze those skills and strengths.
  • Highlight differentiators and commonalities between military work and “civilian” work in resume, CV, and interview. Determine and define transferrable skills.
  • Prepare ahead of time walk-throughs of military leadership events/examples and how they relate to or can be utilized in non-military situations.
  • Emphasize servant leadership. Military leaders exemplify the concept of a leader acting selflessly, helping their charges improve their effectiveness in pursuit of their particular Service’s mission.
  • Play up your strengths as veterans; as a group, you are known for precise communication, individual accountability, impeccable execution and natural leadership. Don’t forget to showcase this during the interview. All four skills are in high demand, regardless of position. Give yourself credit for strengths that many non-military job candidates lack. Other key skills to play up: poise, ingenuity, and ability to handle stressful situations well.

Go into transition with goal of advancing and developing your career, not just switching from military to civilian. 

VSB: Based on your experience, what are the most common mistakes made by transitioning military leaders as they begin their job search in the civilian workforce?

BK: 

  • Failure to step away from military top-down leadership style versus a collaborative sometimes ambiguous decision-making style. Leaders need to adjust their perspectives, for example, on hierarchy, chain of command, and urgency. Those concepts are not unimportant, but depending on the organization, processes and projects will probably be handled differently. 
  • As people who have most likely been in service for several years, military leaders have ingrained ways. They sometimes have the inability to leave military jargon and approaches behind. They need to keep the discipline and dedication without the “ma’ams” and “sirs” and “oh-800” instead of “8 a.m.” Employers appreciate the demonstration of accountability towards a role, but perhaps not the rigidity or adherence to rank. 
  • The worst thing one can do during an interview is to use acronyms and military terms that will mean nothing to a civilian recruiter.  Speaking in plain English and presenting a comprehensive story about oneself is more relevant to a potential non-military career.

(M)ost failures in hires are based on fit, not capability. As we have found out in matching executives with companies over the years – people are hired for what they know, they are fired for who they are.

 

VSB: How do executive search firms ensure a good cultural fit between prospective candidates and the hiring company?

BK:  In most instances companies will find three to four qualified candidates per executive position. All candidates will have equal experience and qualifications for the job. Yet only a few will “fit.” In fact, most failures in hires are based on fit, not capability. As we have found out in matching executives with companies over the years – people are hired for what they know, they are fired for who they are. Of course all roles will not fit all people, but veterans who successfully make the transition will be flexible in their approach to new roles.

 

VSB: Many senior military leaders are seeking an opportunity to work outside the defense sector in their second careers. What advice would you give to help them market their talents and experience more effectively to non-defense related employers?

BK: 

  • Go into transition with goal of advancing and developing your career, not just switching from military to civilian
  • Social networks liked LinkedIn and old-fashioned face-to-face networking are invaluable in showcasing talents in front of a different set of potential employers. 
  • Define your purpose and brand.  This is easier said than done, but with the help of a coach or a program like Leveraging Military Leadership Program (LMLP), a transitioning veteran can really explore how a leader would define him/herself and what he/she represents. For example, if you led large teams in deployments to new regions, highlight change management and leading globally under adversity for a corporation entering new markets. 
  • Emphasize your leadership skills, especially those that apply universally. If you transformed a group of soldiers or introduced a technology platform to streamline processes, those are skills that could be of benefit to a plethora of organizations. 
  • Ensure that you ask yourself, “Am I applying for the appropriate jobs?” Especially at the senior level, leaders must seek jobs that match their level of experience.  
  • Adapt your job title so it is more familiar to those non-military people looking at your resume. This can be done by explaining your responsibilities and helping to make a connection to a non-defense job title.

Jun 14

Continuing to Serve in Your Post-Military Career

dailey-head-shot-civ

Over the past two years, I have interviewed several former military leaders who decided to pursue the nonprofit sector as a second career or as  a volunteer experience. It is clear that many find the continued commitment to mission and a desire to help others to be a natural fit following a long military career.  Retired USAF Chief Master Sergeant Frank Dailey, II  has found his nonprofit career to be especially rewarding.  Currently, he serves as Director of Therapeutic Programs at Heroes on the Water.

VSB: How did you decide to give the nonprofit sector a try? 

Dailey: When I retired from the military, I was not in a hurry to jump right back into business world, I had a short stint as a contractor and realized it was not my cup of tea.

Part of my personal resiliency was to volunteer with a charity, Heroes on the Water, a 501(c)3 that takes wounded, injured and recently returning warriors kayak fishing as a part of their repatriation and resiliency. I was used to analyzing processes and looking for improvements, so I wrote a paper and sent it to the president of the charity. In it, I challenged him to be proactive and directly engage returning active duty members with the tools they would need to reduce some of the stress.  This paper caught the eye of the senior leaders on the Board and the President and CEO.  Within a few weeks, I was interviewed and put on the team. From a hiring perspective, I will warn everyone that the nonprofit community often moves slower than even the military in bringing someone on board.

VSB: Were you concerned about the likelihood of a lower salary than one might gain in the private sector?

Dailey: I was lucky enough to have strong investments coupled with a full military and medical retirement that provided a combined salary better than what I earned on active duty.  It is always a dream to have a job that had me fishing and working with our nation’s best.  It was an easy positive choice for my family and my life.  My family was happy with the person that emerged from the uniform.  I was told by one of the my trusted mentors that you will often have three to four career changes before you find the right one.  Working with a charity introduces you to a broad range of leadership roles that will build your experience.

VSB: How has this experience eased your transition from a military career into civilian life?

Dailey: By doing something I truly loved and feeding my servant’s heart, it made me stronger and a better advocate for Veterans and the community.  I had a lot of stress lifted off my shoulders because I was providing for my family.  My sense of pride in what we are achieving is a reward you cannot measure; it made rising at 4 am to get on the flats with the guys, just a day in the office.  Our impromptu business meetings are held on the water.  Most importantly, I am able to help other people who have been through something few would ever comprehend and am able to help them on their journey all the way home!

One thing I find in my work is that most of us joined to be a part of something bigger than ourselves, by doing something that feeds that desire to serve.  We can achieve a true sense of who we are beyond the uniform.

VSB: What advice would you offer to those currently preparing for separation from military service?

Dailey: If you are able to accurately predict your income and retirement and manage your debts and needs, taking time for a year of service may be the best thing that you can ever do.  Doing this will allow you to adjust your priorities, put a price on quality of life, give you a chance to focus on the wounds you have endured during your time in the military and focus on service.

One thing I find in my work is that most of us joined to be a part of something bigger than ourselves, by doing something that feeds that desire to serve.  We can achieve a true sense of who we are beyond the uniform.  It also introduces you to a host of different experiences.  In January 2014, the President and CEO and I visited 21 members of the Congress and Senate.  We briefed multiple General Officers and titans of industry at the Pentagon, Boeing and the HQ Veteran’s Administration.  Never underestimate the impact and potential of time in the nonprofit sector as the springboard to your next career.

Heroes on the Water (www.heroesonthewater.org) is a nonprofit organization that serves our nation’s warriors by providing healing and rehabilitating kayaking and fishing outings that are physically and mentally therapeutic through a nationwide community of volunteers and donors.

Older posts «